Posted by: John Looker | 3 April, 2015

A Theory of Everything

 

Wild flowers beside a beach. White sand.
Take some and fling it away on the wind.
If we could, we’d watch a single grain – one! ­–
spinning on its axis: indigo, cobalt, azure …

… azure, and sunlight. White clouds swirling.
The sparkling oceans; lands emerald and olive;
cities, towers; and the seed in the ground stirring …

 

© John Looker 2015

 

For reference:
To See, by William Blake

To see a world in a grain of sand,
And a heaven in a wild flower,
Hold infinity in the palm of your hand
And eternity in an hour.

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Responses

  1. Lovely impromptu poem in pan-en-theism tradition! I think Blake’s tradition is mystical. You use your powers as a poet to make the as-if palpable!

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    • Hello Tom. I’m very glad you like it – I hoped it might be of interest to you.

      Like

  2. Fresh, beautiful, and so colorful, John. The more iambic lines of the first stanza lend an almost “scientific” flavor to the imagery, which then proceeds, as if from definiteness into the more trochaic lines of the second stanza. It makes me think of how we humans, from Archimedes to Einstein to the current string theorists have indeed tried to come up with a theory of everything and still it eludes, dissolves around the edges into mystery, and that “seed in the ground, stirring.”

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    • Hi Cynthia. Thank you. Yes, we humans have kept on trying. We have to I suppose.

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  3. This brief reflection spurs thoughts about the beauty of fine focus and the complex eternities contained within a single moment, as I’m sure you intended. Wonderful piece, and thank you for sharing.

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    • I’m pleased that it strikes you that way. Many thanks.

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  4. I like this very much. 🙂

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  5. very nice!

    Liked by 1 person

  6. I recall the first time I realised a Theory of Everything was just interested in everything physical (assuming every ‘thing’ is physical) – I was slightly disappointed. Your poem does a fine job of encapsulating other important aspects of Everything: fascination, wonder, belonging…

    Not that I disrespect modern physics. It is a small world, after all.

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    • Good point Brad. If physicists consider that there might be multiple universes, perhaps also there are also multiple ‘everythings’? 🙂

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  7. Everything is timeless, time is everything, a moment times gift, thanks for the moment John, it means everything.

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  8. This is why I can’t live anywhere too far from the sea…

    Liked by 1 person

  9. The one grain and so much in it 🙂 Like in this poem. Lovely.

    Liked by 1 person

  10. It is beautiful to think of this action as somehow invoking a theory of everything, a single grain flung on the wind, and all its colour (which I so love how they are listed) in the sunlight. This poem is very sumptuous and a delight. It makes me feel warm and carefree. And it induces a lust in me, for those sights, for travel, I suppose. And the lust is that seed in the ground stirring…maybe.

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  11. Thus we all spin, John. From the small into the large into the very large, every molecule spinning in complexity to something larger until that something larger is as big as a galaxy and then a universe. I am hoping your book is selling well.

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    • Thanks Thomas — we’ve sold 40 copies, across 10 countries! I’m delighted.

      Like

  12. John, I love this. It had me thinking of Blake before I even got to the reference at the end. Every line sparkles with imagination – just beautiful!

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    • Thank you Betty! I’m pleased you enjoyed it and also that you picked up the reference to Blake so quickly.

      Liked by 1 person

  13. I love these three middle lines:

    ‘If we could, we’d watch a single grain – one! ­–/spinning on its axis: indigo, cobalt, azure …/… azure, and sunlight. White clouds swirling.’

    I love the image of a grain of sand ‘spinning on its axis’ and the changing of all those colors; especially the transition of azure to sunlight. A powerful effect. Love the title, too; the idea that one grain of sand can, indeed, mean *everything* is resonating.

    Like


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