Posted by: John Looker | 4 March, 2016

Strange Creatures

Moments before, the sea was breathlessly calm.
Suddenly the surface ruptured and a head arose,
dripping, dark. Then onto our beach it came,
lumbering heavily, tossing its head with a roar.

Somewhere in the depths of the mind a memory stirred,
something primeval: wasn’t this how we emerged?
Sea lion. We.       Why you? Why me?

 

© John Looker 2016

Advertisements

Responses

  1. great poem John. Yes, I often wonder

    Sent from my iPhone

    >

    Liked by 1 person

  2. Love this use of verse & metaphor for thinking about the mystery of why you why me. Just wrote a short essay on a Heaney poem which addresses the mystery of why anything at all. See metaphysicsandpoetry.com

    Like

  3. Going deep into primal memories, tying them to the startling roar of a sea lion emerging out of waves, then the eternity of question: Why you? Why me? Why? The whirlpool whirls upon a sea so calm only the sky’s reflection mars its surface. Then, in moment, the swirling is gone and the sky is filled with thunderheads that roar into space and obliterate everything into a dance of blue white lightning and wind-whipped manes of enormous, rolling waves. We are small, John. Small in the doings of the universe.

    Like

    • Aren’t we just, Tom! “Small in the doings of the universe” – you put it very well.

      Like

  4. I hear a beautiful music in these words.

    Liked by 1 person

  5. Clever title! And a very good poem. 🙂

    Like

  6. John, you are such a master of consonance (slant rhyme, off rhyme). Do you do it with malice aforethought, or does it just happen, so that you and the sea lion end up asking each other: why you? why me?

    Like

    • Hi Cynthia. Well, this is a half-sonnet with half rhymes so the question arose how to handle the tercet; the solution was internal rhyme in the final line – which happily carried the poem to where it wanted to end. I suppose that sounds half pretentious though!

      Liked by 1 person

      • Ah, yes…we are always only half in charge, carrying the poem to where IT wants to end…and this one ends in such a felicitous way.

        Like

  7. Excellent.

    Liked by 1 person

  8. Hi John, good poem 🙂 I like the images.

    Like


Leave a Reply

Fill in your details below or click an icon to log in:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out / Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out / Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out / Change )

Google+ photo

You are commenting using your Google+ account. Log Out / Change )

Connecting to %s

Categories

%d bloggers like this: